FAQ's

  1. What does CAMHS stand for?
  2. What will CAMHS help me with?
  3. Where is CAMHS?
  4. Who works in CAMHS?
  5. What will happen in the first appointment?
  6. What if I don’t want to attend the appointment?
  7. How many appointments will I need?
  8. Who else can I talk to?
  9. Can I ask more questions?
  10. Before you see us

1. What does CAMHS stand for?

CAMHS stands for child and adolescent mental health services.

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2. What will CAMHS help me with?

CAMHS help children who are worrying about something or who are having a problem with things at home, in school or in their family.

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3. Where is CAMHS?

The people in CAMHS mostly work in clinics or hospitals, but they can also see you at school, or visit you at home.

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4. Who works in CAMHS?

The people in CAMHS are trained and have skills in working with children, young people and their families, like a special nurse or social worker. CAMHS teams are based in your local area.

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5. What will happen in the first appointment?

At your first appointment staff will talk about why they have been asked to see you and will give you time to talk about your feelings. Together you will work out the best way to help you.

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6. What if I don’t want to attend the appointment?

It is not unusual for a young person to be worried about attending a CAMHS appointment. You might be worried about what will happen at the appointment and whether you might be blamed for problems.

Talk to your parents, teacher, youth worker or school nurse and tell them that you are worried. Ask them to look at the CAMHS information leaflet with you. This leaflet will give you information about what will happen at your first appointment.

If you really don’t want to go to the appointment ask an adult to contact CAMHS and explain why you don’t want to go. It may be possible for a home visit to be organised. Please see answer to ‘What will happen at my first appointment’ for more information.

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7. How many appointments will I need?

Sometimes one appointment is enough to work out problems.  Usually people have more than one appointment.

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8. Who else can I talk to?

There are lots of other people you can talk too. Use the local services finder at the top of each page to find other people/organisations who might be able to help.

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9. Can I ask more questions?

Don’t worry about asking questions.  We will do our best to answer them.

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10. Before you see us

Once your appointment is made, you will receive a letter and a form called the 'Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire.'  This form asks you questions about what your finding difficult.

Either on your own or with your parent or carer please try and answer the questions. Don't worry if you don't know the answers any information you provide will be helpful.

Please remember to bring the questionnaire with you on your first appointment. Please give the questionnaire to the receptionist.

You might also find it helpful to write down things you want to say and things you want to ask. Write your thoughts and questions down and bring them with you.

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